PSB VisionSound 5.1-channel Speaker System

Equipment+
Categories:
Floorstanding,
Stand-mount,
Subwoofers,
Speakers,
Subwoofers
|
Products:
PSB VisionSound
PSB VisionSound 5.1-channel Speaker System

200PSB’s plasma-friendly VisionSound speaker line includes the floorstanding VS400 and the standalone/ wall-mount VS300, available in black or titanium finishes. Our review system consisted of five VS300 satellites plus a 150-watt SubSeries 5i subwoofer.

The flexible VS300s work equally well in vertical or horizontal orientations, and as freestanding or on-wall speakers. The speakers provide two switch-selectable crossover settings— NORMAL, for freestanding applications, and ON-WALL, a setting that compensates for wall bounce and other on-wall response anomalies. The VS300s ship with adjustable wall-mount brackets and center-channel feet, but can be converted for vertical, tabletop use via a kit that provides bolt-on, pedestal-type stands. We used our VS300 mains and surrounds in tabletop configurations.

The VS300 system’s tonal balance falls just on the warm side of neutrality, with punchy bass, a vibrant midrange, and clear but slightly understated highs. This balance represents a smart compromise on PSB’s part because it makes the VS300s relatively tolerant of modest electronics while still enabling the system to sound vivid and engaging. I was impressed by how articulate and detailed the VS300’s midrange was, and by how loudly the system could play.

PSB’s VisionSounds use new longthrow, four-inch midbass drivers that push bass response down to a respectable 68Hz. More importantly, the drivers reproduce midrange details with terrific subtlety and nuance. On “Speak” from Nickelcreek’s This Side [Telarc, SACD], they rendered the delicate inflections of Sara Watkin’s lead vocals and the surround-channel whispers with downright eerie accuracy.

Spatially, the VS300s reach for, and almost achieve, holographic surroundsound imaging. The only problem is that faint traces of upper midrange/ lower treble coarseness occasionally disrupt the system’s otherwise threedimensional presentation. Fortunately, the problem occurs infrequently, and can be mitigated by extended break-in, which helps smooth the VS300’s sound.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Featured Articles